Flooring and kitchen

Understanding the Difference Between Resin Bonded Surfacing And Resin Bound Surfacing

Summary

Slip-resistant surfaces that are also attractive are required in many settings. There are two common ways to achieve your desired result, whether the objective is safety or aesthetics. It is sometimes difficult to distinguish resin bound surfacing from resin bonded […]

Slip-resistant surfaces that are also attractive are required in many settings. There are two common ways to achieve your desired result, whether the objective is safety or aesthetics.

It is sometimes difficult to distinguish resin bound surfacing from resin bonded surfacing, as the two surfaces sound similar, but there are some clear differences. We’ll review the differences between these two techniques in this article, as well as how each of them is generally applied to a variety of applications.

What do you mean by resin surfacing?

A resin-surfaced floor is composed of aggregates that are glued onto a base layer to create a slip-resistant, firm surface. There are several differences in the methods, finishes, and basic properties of the two techniques used to accomplish this.

Stone blend resin bound surfacing

Mixing aggregates with a resin allows resin-bound surfaces to be created. In the next step, the mixed material is poured onto the base surface, where it is spread with trowels and finished to leave a smooth, skid-proof, water-permeable finish.

Stone top Resin bonded surface

In a resin-bonded surfacing, the base layer is first applied with and spread with resin, followed by the aggregates. This is known as the scatter method. A rough surface is left behind as the aggregates bond to the resin, forming an impermeable surface with a rough texture. After the newly finished surface has cured, all loose aggregates that have failed to bond are swept away and removed.

The main differences

Based on the above descriptions, it is clear that the main factors that distinguish the two techniques are their application methods and their surface properties.

Unlike resin bonded surfacing, resin bound surfacing is permeable to water. It is because of these differences that each procedure is suitable for different applications.

There are also differences in the feel and finish of the two techniques. Stone tops have a rougher and more textured appearance than stone blends, which are flat to the touch. In addition, how these surfaces are used is affected by this.

Uses and applications

Resin bound surfaces: Stone blend surfaces feature a smooth surface and excellent permeability, so they can be used for drives, pathways, and gardens without requiring additional drainage systems.

A resin bound surface provides a uniform finish and can be used in an outdoor showroom, plaza, or any other outdoor area that needs an attractive yet completely hassle-free surface, and the range of colours available means it can complement any style, theme, or decor. It is also possible to lay colored crushed glass for an especially beautiful finish.

Resin bonded surfaces: When it comes to these surfaces, it’s important to keep their impermeability in mind. With the rough finish of resin bonded surfaces, a high degree of friction is created, making them ideal for driveways and carparks, but to prevent standing water and avoid flood risk, drainage channels must be planned in advance.

An alternative to loose gravel, stone top surfaces look as good as loose gravel but are not as hassle. The aesthetic of this material can be applied to driveways, footpaths, and patios, eliminating the need for constant maintenance associated with loose stone.

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